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Posts from the ‘Grammar’ Category

Adjective + Preposition = Phrasal Verbs

look for the dictionary meaning of these phrasal verbs. Try and make sentences with the help of these phrasal verbs. Learn to recognise them and if possible memorise them.

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Although / Even though / Though

although-eventhough

Although, Though, Even Though:

These expressions are almost the same in the meaning. The way in which these expressions are used in a sentence is also similar. Let us look at some of the example sentences to learn the usage effectively.

After reading the samples, I’d recommend you to write some sample sentences of the same type and get it corrected from your English Faculty.

  1. Although it was raining, I could come to class.
  2. I made up my mind to attend the test, although I am uncertain about the result.
  3. Though I missed my bus in the morning, I was the first to reach the class.
  4. It was raining and I got wet, although I carried an umbrella.
  5. Even though one prepared well, the future is uncertain and often mysterious.
  6. Though you have a sour throat, you can sing today.
  7. Although Kerala is 100% a literate state, people sometimes behave uncultured.
  8. Education, although meant for intellectual development, is not necessary to contribute useful citizens.
  9. Though I was ill, I attend office yesterday.
  10. You can call me ‘Although’, though my name is ‘Even though’.

 

V2 – Simple Past

 

v2 n

V2 is usually the second part of the verb chart. This form of the tense is so simple and easy that anyone in the world can learn it in a few minutes.

v1 / Simple Present or Future v2 / Simple Past v3 / Past Participle v4=v1+s/es Simple Present v5=v1+ing Continuous Tenses
go went gone goes going

This verb form has a few specialities.

You don’t need to worry about the quantity of the subjects.

Usually we have articles for all subjects. It is because the number/quantity of the subject is always taken into consideration while deciding on the auxiliary verb or the verb to be used in the sentence. Fortunately, in this type of sentence where you use V2 to indicate a past action the count of the subject never alters the type of the verb or auxiliary verb. Therefore, you needn’t count them.

You don’t need to worry about the right auxiliary verb to use along with it.

Each auxiliary verb matches with a particular type of situation and a particular quantity of the subject. Here in the case of V2 you will never use an auxiliary verb to indicate simple past tense. Simple past tense is of two types: The type one uses auxiliary verb and the type two doesn’t use auxiliary verb.

Note: In the type which uses auxiliary verb unlike the one which we are discussing now, has V1 in the place of V2.

Type 1

Type 2

He went to office

The boy was late

I told him

Mary and I were in the bus

He left the building

She had a little toy with her

Arranged Alphabet

The 26 letters of the English alphabet are so intelligently arranged, they show you the way of life..

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Commonly Confused Words

Learning to differentiate these words will make you confident to face listening, writing and reading tests. To have linguistic acumen, one has to be immaculate in the selection of words. This chapter is aimed at raising some doubts in your mind to reflect and to discuss with the learned.

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Thesaurus in English

A good command of synonyms and related words will be a cutting edge for you to excel in the writing test. The words are of intermediate level.

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Impressive Grammatical Structures

Essays need impressive Grammatical Range to attract the reader. Read these as many times as possible to get used to the nuances of English structure. Pay attention to the phrases to the nuances of English structure.

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A shortcut to Grammar

A few terms in Grammar you should be aware of:

Will, Shall:         

Everybody shall die. Shall we come now?

The employees shall be on a monthly basis.

I will do it.

He will do it.

They will not come.  

(Now the recent developments in English allows you to use WILL on most occasions)

Would:           

I would like to go to America. I would like to tell you something. (Phrases)                        

Would you please do me a favour? Would you mind if I smoke? (Politeness)

If I were a bird, I would fly. (Hypothetical) Gandhiji would argue with Nehru.

He would smoke a lot before his death. (Used to) He told me that he would come (Tense Sequence) I would rather die, than beg

Should:

You should keep left. Should I be given a chance, I shall work diligently. (IF)

Have:               

I have a car. He has a car. They have a car. I had a car. I have had my lunch.

Has, Had:         

I have to get it now. I had to go to Kottayam. I had a haircut.

Do, Does:      

Lal doesn’t know English. Lal and Gopi don’t do Yoga. He does not smoke.

Did:

He didn’t go to church. Who doesn’t have a car? Do they practice yoga?

May:

Mammotty may come.

Might:

Lal might come. Lal might have come.

Can:                

I can lift an elephant. Could: I could not help him. Could you please put me to Miss. Mary? Could you please do me a favour? You could do that.            

Be:                 

Let it be like that. To be or not to be is the question. If Veerappan were the P.M., how nice It would have been!

Being:            

Being a trainer, I forgive you.

It being a holiday let us go for a film.

It is being painted.

Having:          

Having a car attracts overheads.

Having enough funds, he could sleep well.

Ought to:             

We ought to respect our parents.

Used to:

I used to smoke when I was in the Gulf.

Get:                       

She got married.

He got selected.

I’ve got it repaired.

I am getting lots of proposals.

Syntax:                  

Bachchan knows how to dance.

I know little Sanskrit.  

The rich have exploited the poor.

Everybody/ Nobody/ Each/Every/ Everyone knows English.

(Agreement of verb with Subject is important in English)

Adjectives:           

Humble Kevin is quietly leading a simple life in the midst of horrible hooligans,

Adverbs:    

great plotters, grandiose friends, regressive politicians and silly students.

Articles:                

An apple a day keeps the greedy doctor away.

I am going to the UK.

He is the man.

Hoarding will affect the availability of staple food.

The news is shocking.

Various Structures:

I wish I had a car.

He made me cry.

One of my Friends has gone to Calicut.

I look forward to hearing from you.

First come, first served.

The earlier the better.

It being a holiday, why should I come?

Little:

(Little, Few, Less, Seldom, Scarcely and rarely mean not enough.

(They are not totally negative.)

We know little about the origin of the universe.

Little knowledge is dangerous.

I have a little money for you. He hardly knows anything.

Few:

Few people attended the meeting.

Few have understood the Theory of lativity.

A few:

A few people attended the meeting.

The few:

The few people who had gathered there have also vanished.

Hardly:

Hardly anybody was there for the gathered there have also vanished.

Hardly anybody was there for the meeting.

Would have:

if I were there, the SI wouldn’t have beaten you.

Should have:

You should have told it to me yesterday.

Could have:

I could have helped you if needed.

Apposition:

Kevin, the innovative Magician, has a passion for novelty.

Gandhi, the renowned advocate of ahimsa, was assassinated.

Gerund:                    

Watching too much TV is injurious to health.

Eating meat will make you rude.

Phrases:

In the morning, at night, at home, in the long run. To my mind. In the meantime.

Idioms:

Let’s keep our fingers crossed. I am leaving for good. Sachin called it a day.

Collocations:

Let’s have lunch. Walking distance. In dire need. Pay attention. Ride a bike.

Complex Sentences:

She became the leader. Only because her father was assassinated.

As I have no wheels, how can I come for the meeting?

Compound sentences:

India is booming while the poor people are being exploited.

When Veerappan was after money, our bureaucrats are after power and money.

Has been:                    

He has been smoking for five years.


Have been:

I have been teaching English for he last 20 years.

(We have lived here for 20 years. This is correct) I had been working in the Gulf from 1976 to 1996. Gandhi had been assassinated.

Since:                   

I have been working since March, 08.

For:

I have been studying here for 3 months.

He has left for the US.

But for the fact that I am a woman, I should have hit him down.

Reported speech:     

He told me that he would come. I asked him whether he would accompany me.

Correlative Conjunction:                

Both Lal and Sal have come.

Either you go or I will. It is too heavy for me to lift.

The more you eat, the fatter you become.

Transitive Verb:        

Rahul killed a mosquito.

Intransitive verb:

Mr. Birdy died.

Birds fly.

Homonyms:

I saw the saw mill.

Ice is not good for eyes.

I saw a sewing machine.

Conditional Clause:  

If were you, I would have scored a 9 band.

If you cook, I will fast.

 

      

      

 

Conditional tense

Learn the nuances of conditional tense. This tense is not commonly taught in many of our schools and colleges. Learn it to avoid mistakes while using ‘if’ and ‘when’.

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Forms of verbs

Learn the forms of verbs to speak and write well in English.

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Should I be good at Grammar to excel in International English Exams.

When there are no rules followed a cricketer finds it difficult to play with the team. Because the rules form a common ground to protect the player and ease the learning process for a learner of the game. Similarly, grammar forms a common ground on which a user of the language is able to express himself/herself clearly and the new learner finds it easy to learn the language. Therefore it it necessary to learn the language and its grammar rules immaculately.

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